3:11 pm - Friday November 23, 6227

Switzerland

Tight immigration laws mean that Switzerland is a difficult place to find a teaching job on spec. School have to prove that no Swiss person could do the job which means that only highly qualified teachers stand a chance of getting a job here. If you do decide that Switzerland is the place for you, you could approach the various international schools in the country to see if they need teachers. You’ll need at least two years’ experience in teaching before they will consider you for employment. January and February are good months to look for jobs. Another possibility is to find work at a summer camp.

Embassy in UK:

16-18 Montagu Place, London W1H 2BQ

Tel: 020 7616 6000

Embassy in USA:

2900 Cathedral Ave NW, Washington DC 20008

Tel: 202 745 7900

www.swissemb.org

British Council office:

Sennweg 2, PO Box 532, CH 3000 Berne 9

Tel +41 (31) 301 1473

www.britishcouncil.org/switzerland

Ü  Visa/Work Permits:

You need a work permit to teach in Switzerland. Permis A allows you to work seasonally, when the local workforce is considered too small to cope with the demand. Permis B can be granted for a specific one-year contract but the employer must guarantee a minimum number of hours and prove that no Swiss national could do the job.

Ü  Requirements:

College Degree and a TESOL/TESL Certificate

Ü  Cost of Living:

Most things are expensive in Switzerland.

Ü  Currency:

£1 = 2.38 / $1 = 1.22 Swiss Francs

Ü  Salaries/Taxes:

SFR 40-70 per hour in a private language school. Tax is around 15%.

Ü  Accommodation:

Schools often help in finding accommodation, but as with everything in Switzerland – it’s expensive!

Ü  Health advice:

Many international schools will take care of your health insurance.