3:11 pm - Monday November 23, 6207

Austria

It is nearly impossible for non-EU citizens to live and work in Austria on a part time, freelance basis unless married to an EU citizen or in possession of a special visa (e.g., for the arts) and nearly all teaching positions are freelance. If you have a student visa for a university in Austria, this might give you eligibility to work. There is stiff competition for teaching jobs from the expatriate community. The most commonly available work is part-time and company-based.

Embassy in UK:

18 Belgrave Mews West, London SW1X 8HU,

tel: +44 (0)20 7235 3731

www.austria.org.uk

Embassy in USA:

3524 International Court NW, Washington DC 20008

tel: +1 202 895 6700

www.austria.org

British Council office:

Schenkenstrabe 4, A -1010 Vienna

tel  +43 (1) 533 2616

Www.britishcouncil.at

 

Ü  Visa/Work Permits:

For non-EU nationals intending to work or study in Austria, a residency permit is required. Contact the Embassy or Austrian Consulate General. US citizens may enter Austria as tourists and apply for a residency permit with the relevant authorities in Austria.

Ü  Requirements:

College Degree, experience and a TESOL/TESL Certificate

Ü  Currency:

£1 = € 1.49,  $1 = € 0.76

Ü  Cost of Living:

Austria is a relatively cheap European country.

Ü  Salaries/Taxes:

Expect to earn around £10 per hour but this depends on your qualifications. If you are contracted expect to earn £600 a month. Income tax and social security deductions are around 40%.

Ü  Accommodation:

A one-bedroom apartment in Vienna or Salzburg will cost around £250 per month.

Ü  Health advice:

Insurance coverage is advisable.

Ü  English Language Media:

The Vienna Reporter